Success!

Well, I have some good news to report.
Yesterday afternoon I went to Cafe on the Dam ( http://www.cafeonthedam.com/ ) and showed some of my work. They agreed to take it on consignment, which means that if it sells, we both make some money.
They took everything I had with me, which made me want to have taken more, but you are only as good as the worst piece of work you are displaying, so perhaps the minimal work on display was a good thing?

Either way, I’m very happy with this success. Cafe on the Dam is set in a lovely location, in the bush behind Jarrahdale and Serpentine. Not only is it local to us, it is the kind of location I would like to display my work anyway and that is a really important thing.

I didn’t take any photos of the event happening, it was more a business transaction anyway. After we had agreed on what kind of commission the cafe would get, my partner and I had lunch and a short walk around the dam wall. My partner took a lot of photos, I have to say, I dislike being the subject of so many photos.

As usual, I wasn’t 100% prepared and I have to now write short little spiels for each piece. Well, I don’t have to, but I think that at least adding the location and description of each photo would add value for potential customers.

In other news, the last week has been very busy photographically for me. Exactly this time last week I was shooting for the cover of my employers new brochure. The shoot was a last minute request and was well timed as I was due to leave site and return home with in a few hours. Fortunately, my boss knew what he wanted and the surveyor I was working with was a great assistant/model. To help, nature put on an amazing sunrise.

Self Portrait, at work.

My employer ended up going with something similar to this.

Dampier has possibly one of the cleanest ports I have ever visited. Despite being a hub for heavy industry, nature exists here in all her glory and with just a little photoshop, you might never know otherwise.

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Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) patrolling the coast line

Over the Fathers Day weekend, we were visited by our niece. Being a child, she is wide eyed with wonder out here. As a child I remember the joy of visiting farms, playing with horses and chickens, bush walking, and it is very satisfying to see it in another young child.

Sun Dews are magnificently soft and only a little bit sticky.

Millstream-Chichester National Park, a brief tour

Being the mining, oil and gas industry, we have a plethora of silly and nonsensical rules.

One of the not so bad sometimes rules is the mandatory RDO. That’s a rostered day off for you casual workers. On this site, we aren’t allowed to work more than 13 days straight before we have a day off, and that day happened on last Sunday.
Thankfully, the crew here is pretty lively, interested in the local surrounds and keen to get out amongst it. So, the site supervisor took it upon himself to motivate us all to pile into the work 4WD’s and head out to Millstream Chichester National Park.
It’s here https://maps.google.com/maps?q=millstream+chichester+national+park&hl=en&ll=-21.189534,117.358704&spn=1.092208,2.068176&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=58.467737,132.363281&t=h&z=10

Anyhoo, we visited Python Pool and the Homestead, saw a train and another train, then some more trains. I took a photo of two trains. Every one else took videos. After spending some time waiting for the trains to clear the tracks (the boss had a snooze, people on the other side of the tracks made tea), we continued driving around.

The Kiwi in the car was fascinated by everything and after some close calls, heeded my advice to not touch anything. Until he decided that the spinifex looked soft and brushed it with his hand. He whinged like a pom.
After some casual racism and a bit more driving we saw some cows. I didn’t take a photo of the cows.

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Driving East towards Python Pool.

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The Homestead, built to last!

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The Homestead, it lasted long enough for me to take two pano’s.

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Spinifex Dove? These were really cool birds. They were not keen to be photographed, so would hide behind tufts of grass. They would run behind a tuft, look up over it, duck down, run behind another tuft and then look up to see if I was still there.

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Iron Ore trains. You haven’t been delayed by a train until you’ve been delayed by one of these. They seem to go for kilometres, a never ending flow of metal. Both literally and metaphorically.

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Python Pool. Not quite the gorges of Karajini, but special in it’s own way. I can only imagine being here 10,000 years ago, wandering through such a inhospitable landscape, coming across this place. Millstream Chichester has a strong history with the original inhabitants of this land, not just for it’s water, but also for the varieties of plants that grew there. The area was used as a meeting place for a long time.

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I don’t know, it’s a rock.

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The last photo I took. We had driven through Millstream Chichester, and were now heading back towards the township of Roeburne.

Despite my derisive sarcasm, I had a great time. Having other people waiting on you really forces you to focus and take a shot, rather than waiting around and hoping something better comes along.
I hope to do another trip on my next RDO, perhaps go further afield?

Working in the North West, the brighter side.

Ok, so my last post finished on a somewhat negative note. It wasn’t really my intention, but I felt I needed to express something that I have been feeling for a few years now.

So, for this post, I thought it would be nice to list some of the positive aspects and talk about the reasons I love working in the North West and other remote parts of Australia.

The first thing would be the most obvious, I get paid to take my camera for long trips into places most tourists or even professional photographers don’t get to go. This results in some fairly unique experiences.

In his natural habitat.

In his natural habitat.

This was shot a few hours north east of Cue, during an exploration project. We had a few down days where the soil was too damp to sample, so I kept busy shooting and taking selfies….
We spent three weeks living in tents, cooking on campfires and watching the world cup via satellite. It was pretty special.  During the 3 weeks, it rained quite a bit, so we had a fair bit of spare time to explore the region we were in.

Our adventures took us to an abandoned station a few Km north of us. I don’t know the story behind the station, or why it was left,  but what did know was that they left behind a lot of stuff. There were entire windmills stripped to pieces and left in ordered piles, stacked in grid patterns, behind a shed. There were rusted out car bodies, some that looked like they were in good condition before they rusted.
The biggest surprise was the interior of the buildings. Each room was filled with dead animals. Even the rooms that had clear exits had corpses everywhere.

Count the corpses.

This is the bathroom. I would say that it’s gone beyond the renovation stage and onto the condemned stage. I can’t remember how many animals we counted in there, but it was over a dozen. In the bath tub too. Yeah, that’s right, I walked all the way into that room.
When we returned to our camp, it was a wordless and mutual understanding that every item of clothing we wore to this place was getting washed, twice. The smell wasn’t that bad, but it made your skin crawl.

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Something a little more pleasant. Do you ever resent having to be up early in the morning and having to be at the office before sunrise?
Not me, as a photographer, sunrise and sunset are very good times of the day to be shooting.  In the few minutes from shortly before the sun rises to when it just sit over the horizon, magic happens.
The above two shots are minutes apart and are of the same bird. I was driving in to work and I saw a silhouette on a hill near one of our survey stations. The shape and size told me it was a large wedge tail eagle and I decided that the survey station need a closer inspection.
Visiting a place and spending a few days there shooting is all well and good, but spend a few months somewhere and you start to learn a lot about where the birds like to perch, which birds are where at what time and other things that make it possible to get stunning shots with ease.

Before

After

Ofcourse, it’s not all just lazing around with the camera, snapping away at what ever happens to come with range.
Some times I do work. What you see above is a before and after. Entirely unintentional, I just happened to be driving back from site on this road and notice the pretty sunset. In the exact same spot. At mile stone points in the project.
Industrial and construction photography is a passion of mine, I guess it goes with the enjoyment of the job I do and having a passion for photography in general. I think I’d be pretty happy getting paid to shoot construction projects.

After a week of rock breaking and getting nowhere, the drill and blast crew were called in. Now there is no shortage of crusher dust and road base….